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Conservation

The beauty of Africa is impossible to ignore. Its ancient and timeless landscapes captivate all who venture here and endeavoring to understand her only leaves one wanting more. There are people here that know the value of nature, and they live alongside it and within it. There are cultures that can teach us so much about ourselves and an alternative way in which the world can live. It’s different for everybody, but everybody takes away a piece of Africa that will remain in their hearts forever.

Living and working in Mpumalanga has shown us the delicate complexities that exist between people and wildlife. We have also witnessed situations where the modern world is quickly catching up to, and in many cases overtaking, traditional ways of life.
History has taught us many hard and difficult lessons in conservation. We have seen that even the mighty elephants (that once roamed across an entire continent) can be cut down to a few remaining populations within a single generation. We should have learned by now the true power of the human race and the responsibility that must come with this power.

It’s not, however, all doom and gloom. There are those heroic forces of conservation that have stood up against these atrocities, and literally laid down their lives for their belief in the cause. Africa owes a great dept to the people who have dedicated their lives to saving these precious species. Elephants are once again a common sight in places like Zambia, and rhinos are being re-introduced to many conservation areas throughout Southern Africa. There are so many positive success stories shining throughout Africa, and for this we are very grateful.

If African conservation is to succeed and prosper, then it must be economical for those countries that set aside vast tracts of land, and it must make sense to the communities living in these areas. This may not sound like much, but it is essential that wildlife can “pay” for itself, and people must feel the benefits of respecting National Park regulations. Thankfully there are companies within the safari realm that work to ensure communities are feeling the ripple-effects of successful National Parks and Game Reserves.  As travel consultants, we are in a unique position to support these companies and the individuals responsible for making conservation viable in Africa.

African Avenue realises that we can all do our part in protecting the environment and installing a sense of respect for the world in which we live. We look forward to working with people and learning the many lessons that Africa can teach us. After all, the natural beauty of this continent is everybody’s business, and we can only hope to leave this world in a better shape than we found it.